Taking care of the flute is important because a well maintained flute lasts a lifetime and develops an ever more beautiful sound!

Warming up
Every flute which is new or has not been played for a while should be warmed up. When the flute is played, breath (air) moisture gets into the instrument. By slowly warming up the flute this moisture spreads over the entire wall thickness of the flute's tube. If this is ignored, the inner, moist, wood expands but the outer, dry, wood does not. This can lead to tearing of the latter.
Instruments that have not been played for a long time should be oiled. (see Oiling)
The first week, you should not play the instrument longer than five to ten minutes a day.
The second week, no longer than fifteen minutes a day.
Only then the flute is ready. If you do not play for a few weeks the flute should be warmed up again ... it does not matter if you didn't play a day 😉

Oiling
Oil protects the flute against breathing moisture and gives the inner surface a finer structure. Response and sound of the flute are clearly improved.
Use almond or sesame oil. Mustard oil is also very suitable, it can be added to other oils as a protection against bacteria and mould.
These are oils which, unlike most of other (cooking) oils such as olive oil or linseed oil, do not become resinous and thus do not clog the flute.
Make sure that no oil comes into the windway during oiling. The block of the flute should be able to absorb the respiratory moisture.
Attach to a wire a piece of cloth with help of a wire loop. Dip the cloth into the oil, shake off the drops and wipe it two-three times through the flute. Then, put the flute upright to rest so that the oil can flow out downwards and does not endanger the windway.

Impurities in the windway
Caution, windway and labium are particularly sensitive.
If the windway is contaminated this can interfere with the sound. To clean it, use a piece of thin plastic or hard paper cut to the right size and push it gently through the windway.

Bilder zum Ölen folgen
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